Uninvited: A Book Review

Book: Uninvited (Uninvited #1)
Author/Authoress: Sophie Jordan

Uninvited (Uninvited, #1)

Cover: 4/5

  I like the simplicity of the background and the clothes Davy is wearing. They contrast and really highlight the hair ( see what I did there?).  In fact, I loved the juxtaposition so much, I actually attempted to draw it. Unfortunately, the hair that I drew came out nowhere near as beautiful as the hair on the cover. And the tagline : They say she’s a killer. One day she will be. Pure genius.

The cover’s obviously pretty and the hair twisting into DNA strands at the end is super cool but…I still can’t give the cover a 5. I guess I can blame part of it on my dislike for covers with pretty girls with amazing hair on the cover. They’re a dime to a dozen, and honestly-they’re sort of cliché and unoriginal.

Plot: 2/5

Blurb: The Scarlet Letter meets Minority Report in bestselling author Sophie Jordan’s chilling new novel about a teenage girl who is ostracized when her genetic test proves she’s destined to become a murderer.
When Davy Hamilton’s tests come back positive for Homicidal Tendency Syndrome (HTS)-aka the kill gene-she loses everything. Her boyfriend ditches her, her parents are scared of her, and she can forget about her bright future at Juilliard. Davy doesn’t feel any different, but genes don’t lie. One day she will kill someone.
Only Sean, a fellow HTS carrier, can relate to her new life. Davy wants to trust him; maybe he’s not as dangerous as he seems. Or maybe Davy is just as deadly.

My thoughts: I like the whole idea of the Homicidal Tendency Syndrome. I really do. It makes sense. After all, hasn’t mankind been trying to figure out how to identify psychopaths, sadists and murderers from the beginning of time? I like the idea that it can be identified by a single gene. And I can see how that idea will inevitably lead to a mandatory test issued by the government to see if it’s citizens carry that ‘kill’ gene.
But in the book, it remains pretty much nothing more than an idea. Sure, we see how badly people who are HTS positive are treated. In fact 3/4th the book was spent in boring, repetitive descriptions of how the MC had it all- close friends, an amazing boyfriend, a close family who adores her, an acceptance into Julliard and the general respect of everybody else- and how she lost it all in one swoop when she was tested HTS positive. I can understand that it was hard for her to be treated badly and I appreciate the point Sophie Jordan tried to make: that a lot of HTS people were treated really badly even though they didn’t deserve it. But, come on 3/4th of a book? That’s way too much. There’s no action, romance or anything halfway interesting in that part of the book. Zero. Zip. Zilch. Nada.

It does pick up after 3/4th the book after Davy gets sent to a special facility created by the government for training. But it was too little, too late.

Characters: 1/5

Davy: I did not like Davy at all. She was judgemental and snobby. And it took her forever to accept that she really was a HTS carrier. In fact most of the book, her attitude is like:

I’m different. The exception.

Throughout the book she judges the HTS carriers harshly. Really harshly. And when someone judged her or pointed out that she was a HTS carrier as well, she used to get very, very angry, whiny and tearful.  Another thing I hated about Davy was her Mary-Sue’ish factor. About it- it was waaay up there. She was a music prodigy– she has an amzing voice and sheplayed the violin, piano, cello and God only knows how many more instruments. Okay, I guess that justifies her early admission into Julliard. I’m not annoyed with that part. It’s plausible even if it’s kind of out there. But here’s what I do have a problem with:

“And as if being a music prodigy isn’t enough, when you were four years old you walked into my room and finished the puzzle that had been kicking my ass for the past week.”

You have the breeding the other girls lack. Gentility, if you will

So let’s do a mental tally of what Davy’s like so far

  1. She’s pretty
  2. She’s a music prodigy and she’s crazy talented.
  3. Everybody loves her. Her parents, her brother, her friends, her boyfriend. You name it- they love her (until they find out she’s HTS positive, anyways)
  4. She’s super smart too.
  5. She apparently has ‘good breeding’ and ‘gentility
  6. She was lucky enough to be born rich unlike most HTS carriers. Not that she took advantage of it, because then she wouldn’t be sweet enough.

Kay, really how much more Mary-Sue can you get?

The side characters…well, most don’t play a major role.

Family: Her Mom and Dad don’t exist in the book until they have to sign a waiver allowing her to go to the killing school. I guess that was supposed to prove a point. Like how they withdrew their support or something but it didn’t come across like it. It seemed more like Sophie Jordan forgot they were supposed to exist at times. She did something similar with Davy’s brother. He was the ex-‘family screwup‘ (his and Davy’s word’s- not mine) and he would randomly pop up to say something ‘inspirational’ and ‘caring’ and then pop back out of the story until the next time Davy felt like she needed motivation.

 Old friends: Davy’ boyfriend passive-aggressively makes her breakup with him after she becomes HTS positive. Maybe he’s a boy but he definitely doesn’t deserve the friend part of boyfriend. But even he doesn’t even compare to Davy’s best friend, Tori. Now Tori breaks all of friendship’s major rules and then some. First of all, she discusses Davy behind her back. Then this part is where the ‘and some’ comes in- she reports her so-called best friend for having violent tendencies after Davy breaks up and slaps her previously mentioned jerk of a boyfriend. Can you believe that?

New friends: Davy didn’t really make an effort to make any new friends after she was found t be HTS positive. She thought she was above them or something. Gil was her only friend throughout. He was one character that I was rather ambivalent towards. He was a computer genius, got perfect ACT scores, was kind of a wimp physically but really loyal deep down.  A cliché. But he might grow into his role in the next few books.

Romance:1/5

This is the part of the book in which there’s a major difference of opinion. Some people like Sean. Others really, really don’t.  Personally, I fall into the second category. He’s the hot, smooth bad boy who warns the MC not to trust him, pushes her away but rescues her anyways. Yes, that one. The one who’s been featured in, what a thousand books? already. Seriously someone should write a new type of love interest. It can’t be too difficult.

Action:5/5

 Throughout most of the book, I was like Wait- what? That makes no sense at all. But I never actually gave up on the book. Somehow the action and the general fast-pace of the book kept me reading. Even when this book passed a point in stupidity at which I close most books. And because I can say that, I can say that the action in this book was pretty well written.  In that respect, this book kind of reminds me of Divergent. Or maybe I was reminded of that book only because of the part where the HTS carriers are taken to a secure facility to be trained and taught how to kill effectively.

There are plenty of descriptions of violence that aren’t sugarcoated for a younger audience. But even then, this book managed to stay within the boundaries set for young-adult. Nothing was exaggerated for the sake of evoking a sense of disgust.

This book has the most important element necessary for a dystopia: a very real sense of fear, frustration and helplessness. A sense that things are bad and they’re gonna get worse. I’ve read plenty of dystopian books that have failed to convince me that things are really that bad, but there’s no danger of that here.

Plotholes:3/5

Sophie Jordan was able to incorporate a lot of important, mature themes like nature vs. nurture, hypocrisy, how treating people as if you expected violence from them actually encourages violence, how women are generally treated as means of entertainment and how they are simultaneously patronized and feared. It was commendable that she brought in all these issues but somehow none of these issues worked their way to the forefront. They all sort of sunk into the background, pretending to be unimportant while an inane, annoying romance and a vague, shaky plot enjoyed the limelight.

Dialogue: 2/5

I searched this book, cover to cover but all I found were these meh-sentences. Nothing particularly catchy or inspiring here.

“Exactly what he wanted me to do. Exactly what they all thought I would do. Everyone in here. Everyone out there in the world. A world so afraid of carriers, it makes killers out of the innocent.”

“Never forget that we are more than the genetic code. We can be more than labels applied to us. We can be more than what others whisper behind our backs. Free will exists. We need to choose to be the best we can be and we need to help others do the same. Believe in yourself.” 

 Overall Rating: 2/5

This book came with a lot of expectations. Not just for me (although I did have them after reading Ms. Jordan’s book Firelight which was actually pretty good)  but for everyone. This book has been compared positively to Article 5 by Kristen Simmons, The Program by Suzanne Young and Reboot by Amy Tintera. All major dystopian books which have made big names for themselves. But somehow the work managed to be ordinary, bland and clichéd. Just another case of a book that didn’t live up to it’s high expectations. Kind of like The Selection by Kiera Cass if you think about it.

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